Interview mit Ville Seponpoika Sorvali von Moonsorrow

  • Englische Version

    Deutsche Übersetzung…

    Moikka, Ville!!! Thank you for taking your time for this interview. Kuinka voit?
    Hey there! I’m fine, it’s a nice weather outside and I just had a cup of coffee and a cigarette. I was also positively surprised about my Visa bill from the European tour as it wasn’t as much as I expected.

    It’s getting warmer and warmer here in Hamburg. Has spring already arrived in Finland?
    At least it’s trying its best. We had a couple of really warm days already and we used them for drinking beer outside.

    This is already the third Moonsorrow/metal1.info-interview – perhaps the start of a tradition. Do you recall the last interview from December 2006? It was about your last album „Viides Luku – Hävitetty“, the pagan metal scene and the combination Mitja + fire extinguisher.
    Sure, I remember that. Fun answering that as always.

    What has happened in, with and around Moonsorrow since then?
    Quite a lot, we did a lot of touring in 2007, a new EP in the beginning of 2008 and another European tour in April. We have a lot of good memories from 2007 all in all.

    The „Tulimyrski“ EP has a playtime of almost an hour – other bands can hardly produce a regular album that’s that long. How come that you are so incredibly productive?
    I don’t know if we are incredibly productive just because we make long songs. We just didn’t want to do this half-way but decided to give the fans their money’s worth with an overlengthy EP. :)

    Why did you choose a snow/ice theme for the cover art when „Tulimyrsky“ actually means „Firestorm“?
    Well, it’s only the front cover. We wanted to make it that way, so it deceives the listener at the first glance and only reveals the actual firestorm when you open up the whole sleeve.

    What’s the story of „Tulimyrski“?
    In short, it’s a continuation to the story on „Voimasta ja kunniasta“, where the main character’s village is destroyed by people from another village. Back then they were betrayed by this main character’s brother, and now they are going back to seek vengeance. They actually want to find the betrayer from the other village, but since he’s already dead, they can’t find him and just end up burning the whole village and coming home with the riches.

    „Tulimyrski“ is, in my opinion, a display of your whole discography put into one song. Especially the middle part with its cheerful melodies differs somewhat from your last two albums. Did that just develop like that or is it a deliberate combination of reminiscing and evolving?
    We just wanted to create a song that fits the story, and we didn’t think about any musical restrictions or guidelines. It’s true that it has a lot of elements from our past works, but that came naturally when we started writing the song. It also has some elements we never used before, like the most progressive parts in the middle, or the use of a narrator.

    What were your reasons for covering these two particular songs – „For whom the bell tolls“ and „Back to North“? Do they have a special relevance for you as musicians?
    Metallica and Merciless were both big influences to us in their own ways, and we wanted to pay tribute to them by making our own interpretations of their songs. We could’ve chosen other bands as well, but these two songs seemed to fit our own style of arranging the best.

    Your band is often inofficialy referred to as „Bathory’s heirs“, that’s why a cover of one of Quorthon’s classics might have been a traceable choice. Did you even consider that when deciding which songs to choose?
    No, and simply because of that. A Bathory cover made by Moonsorrow would sound too much like the original, and there’s no point in making a cover if you can’t give it your own twist.

    The songs on „Verisäkeet“ were all around 15 minutes long, on „Hävitetty“ the half hour was reached and „Tulimyrsky“ is almost 30 minutes long, too. How are such songs written? Does the process of writing such overly long songs from writing shorter songs like they exist on „Voimasta ja Kunniasta“?
    We don’t especially intend to write long songs, it just happened to be so that lately all of our material turned out like that. I think our song writing process is always quite similar anyway. Henri makes a home recording based on his ideas (and sometimes on the ideas of others), and keeps sending demos during the process for us to comment on. When we are all satisfied, we go to the rehearsal place to give the song the final touch.

    Have you ever really fucked up one of your long songs when playing live?
    We have fucked up a lot of stuff when playing live, not only the long songs. ;)

    With Finntroll, Henri has a second band that is utterly much on the road, but now he’s on tour with Moonsorrow. How well does he manage to arrange himself between these two?
    Actually, he’s not touring that much, not with Finntroll of with Moonsorrow. This time he just decided to come on the road with us (because he got free from work) and it was fun. But usually there is a substitute for him in both Finntroll and Moonsorrow to do the live shows. He just does the music.

    I know, it’s a vexed and often spoken about topic, but just a few days ago you were defamed as fascism sympathizers in a – to say the least – questionable (not to say bullshit) article (and you already made a statement in which you disclaimend all fascistic tendencies). Has crap like this ever happened to you in your home country?
    We have got some slightly nazi-related accusations in Finland, but people usually understood it when we said that we are not political in any way. Nothing like this recent Antifa crap ever happened before, and it made us really pissed off that we actually had to make statements about some very obvious things to defend ourselves from absolutely false accusations. Anyone who thinks that paganism and nazism are somehow related is a simple uneducated idiot.

    How do you deal with bands who have such a background?
    Nazi bands? I don’t agree with their ideology, but if they make good music, I’ll listen to it. I consider myself intelligent enough to filter the message if it doesn’t coincide with my own view of the world.

    Back to a happier topic! The story of Henri’s disco-sausage and the anecdote about Mitja and the fire extinguisher gave us lots of good laughs. Can you report to us a new funny incident?
    On the 2007 European tour we had a lot of funny incidents, but most of them were not related to our band but our touring partners Swallow The Sun. Maybe we’re getting too old? :) Of course there were all sorts of little details here and there, like Mitja swimming in the fountain in Spain, or Jukka (our sound engineer) taking off his pants in the airplane after some festival, but nothing as striking as the legendary „fire-extinguisher episode“.

    Allright, that’s it! Now you have the rare honor to participate in the fantabulous metal1.wordgame for the second time. Just say what comes to your mind when you hear these things:

    The big Lebowski: Dude.
    Hollenthon: You mean the band? Haven’t heard them to be honest.
    MP3-playing cellphones on the bus: Not good, because you can’t really hear them.
    Sennheiser: Quality.
    Videogames: Quality entertainment.
    The Double Worschter: Don’t know what it means, but it sounds kinky.
    metal1.info: Metal!

    Ville, kiitoksia paljon for the interview – I wish you loads of fun with Moonsorrow further on. We’re awaiting the new album anxiously. The last words are yours!
    Thank you for the interview, and I wish you loads of fun as well. After all, that’s why are in the business!

  • Deutsche Version

    Mit „Tulimyrsky“ habe die finnischen Epik-Experten MOONSORROW eine EP rausgehauen, die so manches Album in den Schatten stellt. Bereits zum dritten Mal kam es zum heiteren Klatsch zwischen der Band und metal1.info – diesmal erneut mit Ville Sorvali über die EP, Produktivität und falsche Anschuldigungen.

    English Original…

    Moikka, Ville!!! Danke, dass du dir die Zeit für diese Interview nimmst. Kuinka voit?
    Hallo! Mir geht’s gut, draußen ist gutes Wetter und ich hatte gerade eine Tasse Kaffee und eine Zigarette. Ich war auch positiv von meiner Kreditkartenrechnung von der Europatour überrascht, da die nicht so lang war wie ich dachte.

    Es wird hier in Hamburg wärmer und wärmer. Ist der Frühling schon in Finnland angekommen?
    Immerhin versucht er sein Bestes. Wir hatten schon ein, zwei richtig warme Tage und haben sie genutzt, um draußen Bier zu trinken.

    Schon das dritte Moonsorrow/metal1.info-Interview – vielleicht der Beginn einer Tradition. Erinnerst du dich noch an das letzte im Dezember 2006? Es ging unter anderem um euer letztes Album „Viides Luku – Hävitetty“, die Pagan-Szene und die Kombination Mitja + Feuerlöscher.
    Sicher, ich erinnere mich daran. Wie immer ein Spaß, das zu beantworten.

    Was ist seitdem bei, mit und um Moonsorrow herum geschehen?
    Ziemlich viel, wir sind 2007 viel getourt, Anfang 2008 eine neue EP und eine weitere Europatour im April. Von 2007 haben wir alles in allem ziemlich gute Erinnerungen.

    Die „Tulimyrsky“-EP ist fast eine ganze Stunde lang – die meisten Bands schaffen das nichtmal mit einem normalen Album. Wie kommt es, dass ihr so ungemein produktiv seid?
    Ich weiß nicht, ob wir ungemein produktiv sind, nur weil wir lange Lieder schreiben. Wir wollten nur keinen halben Kram machen, sondern haben uns entschieden, den Fans mit einer überlangen EP etwas zu geben, das ihr Geld wert ist. :)

    Warum habt ihr eine Schnee/Eislandlandschaft für das Cover gewählt, obwohl „Tulimysrky“ eigentlich „Feuersturm“ bedeutet?
    Nun, das ist nur das Frontcover. Wir wollten das so machen, damit es den Hörer auf den ersten Blick täuscht und den eigentlichen Feuersturm nur enthüllt, wenn du das ganze Booklet aufmachst.

    Was ist die Geschichte von „Tulimyrsky“?
    Kurz gefasst ist es eine Fortsetzung der Geschichte von „Voimasta ja kunniasta“, wo das Dorf der Hauptfigur von Leuten aus einem anderen Dorf zerstört wird. Damals wirden sie vom Bruder der Hauptfigur betrogen, und nun kommen sie zurück, um Vergeltung zu üben. Sie wollen eigentlich den Betrüger aus dem anderen Dorf finden, aber da der schon tot ist, können sie ihn nicht finden und es endet damit, dass sie das ganze Dorf niederbrennen und mit den Reichtümern heimkehren.

    „Tulimysrky“ ist ja quasi ein Querschnitt durch eure komplette Diskographie. Besonders der Mittelteil hebt sich mit den fröhlichen Melodien stark von euren letzten beiden Werken ab. Hat sich das einfach so entwickelt oder ist das eine bewusste Kombination aus Rückbesinnung und Weiterentwicklung?
    Wir wollten einfach einen Song machen, der in die Geschichte passt, und wir dachten nicht über irgendwelche musikalischen Einschränkungen oder Richtlinien nach. Es stimmt, dass er viele Elemente unserer vergangenen Werke enthält, aber das kam ganz selbstverständlich, als wir anfingen, das Lied zu schreiben. Es enthält auch Elemente, die wir noch nie benutzt haben, wie die sehr progressiven Teile in der Mitte, oder den Einsatz eines Erzählers.

    Was hat euch dazu bewogen, genau diese beiden Lieder – „For whom the Bell tolls“ und „Back to North“ – zu covern? Haben die Lieder eine besondere Bedeutung für euch als Musiker?
    Metallica und Merciless waren beide auf ihre eigene Weise große Einflüsse für uns, und wir wollten ihnen Tribut zollen, indem wir unsere eigenen Interpretationen ihrer Lieder machen. Wir hätten auch andere Bands wählen können, aber diese beiden Lieder schienen am besten zu unserem Arrangement-Stil zu passen.

    Inoffiziell habt ihr den Status als „Erben Bathorys“ inne, deswegen hätte eine Coverversion von einen von Quorthons Klassikern nahegelegen. Kam das für euch in Frage?
    Nein, und einfach darum. Ein Bathory-Cover von Moonsorrow würde zu sehr wie das Original klingen, und es ist sinnlos, ein Cover zu machen, wenn du ihm nicht deinen eigenen Drall geben kannst.

    Schon die Songs auf „Verisäkeet“ waren alle um die 15 Minuten lang, auf der „Hävitetty“ wurde die halbe Stunde erreicht und auch „Tulimyrski“ ist wieder fast 30 Minuten lang. Wie schreibt man solche Lieder? Unterscheidet sich der Prozess des Songwritings bei solchen Epen von dem bei kürzeren Lieder, wie es sie noch auf der „Voimasta ja Kunniasta“ gab?
    Wir nehmen es uns nicht besonders vor, lange Lieder zu schreiben, es ist einfach so passiert, dass zuletzt unser ganzes Material am Ende so aussah. Ich denke, unser Songwritingprozess ist eh immer recht ähnlich. Henri nimmt zu Hause etwas auf, das auf seinen Ideen (und manchmal den Ideen anderer) basiert und schickt uns während des Vorgangs Demos zum Kommentieren zu. Wenn wir alle zufrieden sind, gehen wir in den Probenraum, um den Liedern den letzten Schliff zu verpassen.

    Habt ihr einen von euren überlangen Songs live eigentlich schonmal so richtig versaut?
    Wir haben live schon so einiges versaut, nicht nur die langen Songs. ;)

    Henri hat mit Finntroll eine Zweitband, die mordsmäßig viel unterwegs ist, nun ist er aber mit euch auf Tour. Wie gut lassen sich die beiden Bands für ihn vereinbaren?
    Eigentlich tourt er gar nicht so viel, weder mit Finntroll noch mit Moonsorrow. Dieses Mal hat er sich einfach entschieden, mit uns auf Tour zu gehen (weil er von der Arbeit frei bekommen hat), und es hat Spaß gemacht. Aber normalerweise gibt es für ihn sowohl bei Moonsorrow als auch bei Finntroll einen Ersatzmann, der die Liveshows macht. Er macht nur die Musik.

    Ich weiß, es ist ein leidiges und oft besprochenes Thema, aber gerade vor ein paar Tagen wurdet ihr in einem äußerst fragwürdigen Artikel als Faschismus-Sympathisanten diffamiert (ein klärendes Statement habt ihr bereits veröffentlich). Habt ihr in eurer Heimat auch schon Erfahrung mit solchem Quatsch gemacht?
    Es gab ein paar Anschuldigungen bezüglich Nazikram in Finnland, aber die Leute verstanden es normalerweise, wenn wir sagten, dass wir in keiner Weise politisch sind. Sowas wie dieser kürzliche Antifa-Scheiß ist uns noch nie passiert, und es hat uns wirklich angepisst, dass wir tatsächlich ein Statement über einige ziemlich offensichtliche Sachen abgeben mussten, um uns gegen völlig falsche Anschuldigungen zu verteidigen. Jeder, der denkt, dass Heidentum und Nazismus irgendwie was miteinander zu tun haben, ist ein einfältiger, ungebildeter Idiot.

    Wie gehst du mit Bands um, die einen solchen Hintergrund haben?
    Nazibands? Ich stimme ihrer Ideologie nicht zu, aber wenn sie gute Musik machen, werde ich’s mir anhören. Ich halte mich selbst für intelligent genug, die Botschaft herauszufiltern, wenn sie nicht mit meiner Weltsicht übereinstimmt.

    Zurück zu einem fröhlicheren Thema. Die Geschichte von Henris Disco-Wurst und die Anekdote von Mitja und dem Feuerlöscher haben für viele Lacher gesorgt. Kannst du uns von einer neuen lustigen Begebenheit berichten?
    Auf der Europatour 2007 gab es viele lustige Begebenheiten, aber die meisten davon hatten nichts mit unserer Band zu tun, sondern mit unseren Tourpartnern Swallow The Sun. Vielleicht werden wir zu alt? :) Natürlich gab es alle möglichen kleinen Details, zum Beispiel Mitjas Bad in einem spanischen Brunnen, oder als Jukka (unser Tontechniker) nach einem Festival im Flugzeug seine Hose auszog, aber nichts so erschlagendes wie die legendäre „Feuerlöscher-Episode“.

    Okay, das war’s! Nun hast du die seltene Ehre, zum zweiten Mal am metal1.Wortspiel teilzunehmen. Sag‘ einfach, was dir zu diesen Sachen einfällt:

    The big Lebowski: Dude.
    Hollenthon: Du meinst die Band? Die hab‘ ich ehrlich gesagt noch nicht gehört.
    MP3-Handys im Bus: Nicht gut, weil du sie nicht wirklich hören kannst.
    Sennheiser: Qualität.
    Videospiele Qualitätsunterhaltung.
    The Double Worschter: Keine Ahnung, was das bedeutet, aber es klingt versaut.
    metal1.info: Metal!

    Ville, kiitoksia paljon für das Interview und weiterhin viel Spaß mit Moonsorrow! Hoffentlich versorgt ihr uns noch lange mit epischer Musik. Die letzten Worte gehören dir!
    Danke für das Interview, und ich wünsche dir auch viel Spaß. Im Endeffekt ist es doch das, warum wir in diesem Geschäft sind!