Interview mit Tony Kakko von Sonata Arctica

  • Englische Version

    – What music did you play before the band was named „Sonata Arctica“?
    TK: It was pop/hardrock/heavy-mixture just for our own fun really. There wasno change getting anywhere with music like that. We actually startedcovering Stratovarius and few other metal acts before we became Sonata. Nicememories from those days.

    – Are you an incorporation member or did you come later to the band?
    TK: I was the first singer in the band, yes. Original member. The band wasfirst formed in December 1995, and I was able to join them in January 1996.At the moment all members in the band are original ones. Our ex-bass playerJanne wasn’t, Mikko wasn’t BUT Marko(who replaced Janne, weird enough) wasone of the guys who really started this band. Later it became more of a bandof mine, so to say, when I started writing songs and so on.

    – Which bands influenced your style the most? Still other bands except ofStratovarius? Nobody can’t deny the affinity.
    TK: Well, Stratovarius is the main influence stylistically, naturally. Butbesides them we all have had our own influences. I for example never reallycared for metal music before I found Stratos thru their Visions-album.Before that I listened bands like Queen, Midnight Oil, Crash test dummiesetc. very NOT metal bands. So I suppose my personal influences from earlierdays are from them.

    – You did to tribute songs, „I Want Out“ (Helloween) and „Still Loving You“(Scorpions). Are you fans of this bands or how did it come to this?
    TK: We were actually asked to do those. And we were really excited about it!We haven’t seen or done much ‚till that time and these were opportunitiesfor making our name more known. Those covers served that purpose very well!I have never been a real fan of those bands. I’ve liked them both, but Idon’t consider myself a fan.

    – On what moment in your career do you remember gladly, and what moment doyou wish to forget for all time?
    TK: The first European tour with Stratovarius was great. Happy to rememberthat. I never forget when I first time heard we?d get to do that tour. Itwas HUGE! Well, there are quite a few things I?d rather forget, but I wishto forget those and not talk about them. J Mostly those things are part oftouring. Few severe hangovers there.

    – Why did you record a live album after only two studio albums? Isn’t that alittle bit early?
    TK: It was an idea of our Japanese label. Taking that we are really popularin Japan, and that the album was mainly meant for Japan, I don?t think itwas that early. It?s for the real fans, who appreciate hearing our songslive. There are quite a few songs that we are never playing again live. Butfor the rest of the world it certainly is a bit early, I know. But whycomplain. No one is forced to buy it or anything. For me it?s a great way toremember our first trip to Japan.
    A small moment in my life I can go back to via this cd. .if I choose to.Haha!

    – Do you all have the same influence on lyrics and melodie, or are you theband dictator and make all this by yourself?
    TK: I write all songs, melodies and lyrics. The other guys are arranging thesongs I write with me, making them sound like Sonata Arctica. I am not adictator! No no no!

    – „Talullah“ is a marvelous ballad, but that’s a really unusual title for asong. What’s the meaning of it and what’s the story behind?
    TK: Thanks! „Tallulah“(you had the double „l“ on wrong place there, haha!)is a girls name atleast in USA. Not in Finland anyway. I found it differentenough to be on this song. It filled the place better than few other names Ithough. Maybe it was a bit too different because one of the most asked questions have been „what is Tallulah?? What does it mean?“. It?s a name folks, aname. Just a name. No story really. I first heard it on some reeeeaally oldJodie Foster movie. She was playing this lady called Tallulah.

    – How can you explain your big success and your quickly ascension?Especially in Japan.
    TK: I can’t. It has all happened really fast, now that I think of it, butliving as far north as we do, I can?t really notice anything special becauseof it. I am maybe too close to the forrest from the trees, so to say. InJapan I think we arrived in the right place at right time with right kind ofmusic.

    – What’s the story behind your big tour with Stratovarius and Rhapsody? Inwhat countries did you perform?
    TK: Aaargh, that was 2,5 years ago! Why is everyone asking about this tour.It ain’t exactly fresh. We toured last year with Gamma Ray and VanishingPoint, but nobody is asking about that. Haha! Well, we were asked to do itand it was like a dream come true. Our first big tour and with such a greatbands! It was amazing! I hope we can have such a great experience again someday.

    – Is there an approximately release date for your third studio album? Areyou already working on that?
    TK: Some time early 2003. Maybe in march or so. Depends on few things.We are in studio at the moment. Going to be an awesome album!

    – You’re momentary searching for a new keyboarder. Tell me, why is the oldkeyboarder not any longer a „Sonata Arctica“-member?
    TK: Read his note from our website. I don’t have anything to add to that.

    – Have you been often in Germany? What’s in your opinion the differencebetween the mentality of germans and finns?
    TK: Quite a few times yes. It’s a whole different culture. Well, not THATdifferent, but different anyway. Mentality? There are matter?s of humour andhaving a common language. I like german folks a lot. They are punctual andserious in what they do. And they usually know what they do. I like that.Finns are like that a lot too, but we like to be alone a lot. „Silence isgolden.“ That is hard for some foreigners to understand.

    – You’re getting more liked and well-known in Germany too. Do you intend todo some gigs here in 2003?
    TK: Nice to hear! I would love to play there more, but popularity is onething we haven’t had there too much. But if it’s getting better, great! I?msure we will tour Europe again with this new album and Germany naturally! Ihope we can play few festivals as well. Wacken etc.

    – What are your plans for the next time and the future?
    TK: I am totally tied with this recording thing. It’s pretty much THE thingin my life for this year. I hope I get to relax before Christmas.
    I don’t like to plan too much now. I know that ifI would, those plans wouldbe ruined next year when we tour and promote a lot.

    – What do you think of little online-mag writers who asks you the samequestions every time?
    TK: Well, there’s nothing wrong with the people asking those same questions.But new questions make my work much more fun, so I appreciate someimagination. J I’m happy I don’t get too much of this „Tell me the historyof sonata shortly, how did it all start?“ -questions. Aaarrggh!

    What do you think when you read the following words:
    – Beans: I know what you’re referring here, but.farts.
    – Sellout: nu-metal, I don’t like that rapmetal-stuff. Either rap ormetal, but.
    – Love: gooooood!
    – Intolerance: baaaad!
    – Alcohol: Sehr gut, if they could somehow eliminate the hangover factor!
    – New Metal: as nu-metal.with very very few exeptions terrible.
    – Wacken: Great festival! I hope they get more sunshine in future.
    – Online-Mags: Cool! The future of small mags is there, I?m sure.
    – MP3: Controversial.
    – Religion: private thing.

  • Deutsche Version

    Eines unser längsten und ausführlichst beantwortetsten Interviews lieferte uns Tony Kakko von Sonata Arctica. Ein schönes Interview.
    Vielen Dank!

    – Was für Musik habt ihr gespielt, bevor ihr euch „Sonata Arctica“ genannt habt?
    Tony Kakko: Das war eine Mixtur aus Pop, Hardrock und Heavy, das haben wir nur zum Spaß für uns gespielt. Wir haben damit angefangen, Stratovarius zu covern. Sind schöne Erinnerungen aus diesen Tagen.

    – Bist du ein Gründungsmitglied oder bist du erst später zu Sonata Arctica gestoßen?
    TK: Ja, ich war der erste Sänger der Band, also ein Gründungsmitglied. Die Band wurde im Dezember 1995 gegründet und mir war es im Januar 1996 möglich, dazu zu stoßen. Momentan sind sogar alle in der Band Gründungsmitglieder. Unser Ex-Bassist Janne war keins, Mikko auch nicht, aber Marko (der seltsamerweise Janne ersetzt hat) war einer der Jungs, die die Band dann wirklich auf die Beine gestellt haben. Später wurde es dann mehr zu meiner Band, als ich angefangen habe die Texte zu schreiben und so was.

    – Welche Bands haben eueren Stil am meisten beeinflusst? Jetzt mal ausser Stratovarius, die Ähnlichkeit kann ja niemand abstreiten.
    TK: Ja, natürlich ist Stratovarius unsere größte Inspirationsquelle. Aber dazu hat jeder von uns seine eigenen Einflüsse. Ich zum Beispiel habe mich nie für Metal interessiert, bis ich Stratos durch ihr Visions-Album gefunden habe. Vorher hab ich Bands wie Queen, Midnight Oil, Crash Test Dummies und so was gehört, und die sind ja definitiv NICHT Metal. Ich würde meine Einflüsse also von früheren Tagen und diesen Bands nennen.

    – Ihr habt zwei Tribute-Songs gemacht, nämlich „I Want Out“ (Helloween) und „Still Loving You“ (Scorpions). Seid ihr Fans dieser Bands oder wie kam es dazu?
    TK: Wir wurden eigentlich danach gefragt, das zu machen, und wir waren sehr begeistert darüber! Wir hatten damals noch nicht viel gemacht und waren noch recht unbekannt, so war es dann eine gute Gelegenheit, unseren Namen bekannter zu machen. Diese Cover-Versionen haben den Zweck auf jeden Fall sehr gut erfüllt! Ich war nie ein großer Fan der beiden Bands. Ich habe beide gemocht, würde mich aber nie als Fan bezeichnen.

    – An welchen Moment in deiner Karriere erinnerst du dich immer wieder gerne zurück, und was würdest du am liebsten einfach vergessen?
    TK: Die erste Tour durch Europa zusammen mit Stratovarius war großartig, ist immer wieder schön daran zurückzudenken. Ich werde nie vergessen, als ich zum ersten mal gehört habe, dass wir diese Tour machen können. Es war RIESIG! Ok, es gibt auch einige Dinge, die ich am liebsten vergessen würde, aber ich will das wirklich vergessen und nicht darüber reden. Das meiste hat mit touren zu tun, das bereitete mir ein paar mal ziemlich ernste Kopfschmerzen.

    – Warum habt ihr nach nur zwei Studio-Alben schon ein Live-Album aufgenommen? War das nicht ein bisschen früh?

    TK: Das war eine Idee unseres japanischen Labels. Sehen wir es mal so, wir waren in Japan sehr erfolgreich und das Album war auch für Japan gedacht. Also denke ich nicht das es so sehr zu früh war. Es ist für unsere wahren Fans, die die Songs live hören wollen. Da sind auch ein paar Lieder dabei, die wir wohl nie wieder live spielen werden. Aber für den Rest der Welt ist es zugegebenermaßen wohl doch etwas zu früh, ich weiß. Aber warum sich beschweren, schließlich ist niemand gezwungen, das oder irgendetwas zu kaufen. Für mich ist es eine gute Möglichkeit, mich an unseren ersten Trip nach Japan zu erinnern. Ein kurzer Moment in meinem Leben, zu dem ich mit dieser CD zurückkehren kann… falls ich das will, haha!

    – Habt ihr alle gleichermaßen Einfluss auf die Texte und Melodien, oder bist du so was wie der Band-Diktator und machst das alles alleine?
    TK: Ich schreibe alle Songs, Melodien und Texte. Die andern Jungs helfen mir dann, dass meine geschriebenen Sachen alle nach Sonata klingen. Aber ich bin kein Diktator, nein nein nein!

    – „Talullah“ ist eine wunderschöne Ballade, aber es ist ein sehr ungewöhnlicher Name für ein Lied. Was bedeutet das und welche Geschichte steckt dahinter?
    TK: Danke! „Tallulah“ (du hast das Doppel-L an der falschen Stelle, haha!) ist der Name eines Mädchens in den USA, nicht in Finnland. Ich fand es anders genug für den Song. Ich denke, es hört sich besser an als einige andere Namen, an die ich gedacht hatte. Vielleicht war es sogar ein bisschen zu anders, denn eine der meistgestellten Fragen, die mir gestellt werden sind „Was ist Tallulah?? Was bedeutet es?“ Leute, es ist ein Name. Nur ein Name. Keine wirkliche Story. Erstmals hab ich’s in einem seeeehr alten Jodie Foster Film gehört, sie hat diese Frau mit dem Namen Tallulah gespielt.

    – Kannst du irgendwie euren großen Erfolg, vor allem in Japan, erklären?
    TK: Nein, das kann ich nicht. Es passierte alles so schnell, wenn ich da jetzt so darüber nachdenke, aber in unserer schnelllebiegen Zeit ist da auch nichts wirklich besonderes dran. In Japan waren wir denke einfach zur richtigen Zeit mit der richtigen Musik am richtigen Ort.

    – Wie kam es zu eurer ersten großen Tour mit Stratovarius und Rhapsody?
    TK: Aaarrgh, das ist jetzt schon zweieinhalb Jahre her! Warum fragt jeder nach dieser Tour? Ich kann mich da nicht mehr so genau dran erinnern. Letztes Jahr waren wir mit Gamma Ray und Vanishing Point unterwegs, aber danach fragt niemand, haha! Naja, wir wurden danach gefragt, und es war wie ein Traum, der wahr geworden ist. Unsere erste große Tour, und das mit zwei so großartigen Bands! Es war großartig! Ich hoffe, wir können irgendwann noch mal so eine tolle Erfahrung machen.

    – Gibt’s schon ein ungefähres Erscheinungsdatum für eurer neues Album? Arbeitet ihr schon daran?
    TK: Irgendwann im Frühjahr 2003 soll es fertig sein, vielleicht im März. Hängt von verschiedenen Dingen ab. Im Moment sind wir im Studio.

    – Momentan sucht ihr ja nach einem neuen Keyboarder. Warum ist denn der alte Keyboarder nicht mehr bei Sonata Arctica?
    TK: Das steht alles auf unserer Webseite. Ich hab dem nicht hinzuzufügen.

    – Warst du schon oft in Deutschland? Was sind deiner Meinung nach die Unterschiede in der Mentalität von Deutschen und Finnen?
    TK: Ein paar mal schon, ja. Es sind zwei völlig verschiedene Kulturen. Ok, nicht SO verschieden, aber trotzdem unterschiedlich. Mentalität? Da sind zum Beispiel der Humor, und die einheitliche Sprache. Ich mag die Deutschen sehr gerne. Sie sind pünktlich und seriös, mit dem was sie machen. Und grundsätzlich wissen sie auch, was sie tun, das mag ich. Finnen sind da nicht viel anders, aber wir mögen es, viel allein zu sein. „Schweigen ist Gold“. Für viele Fremde und Ausländer ist das oft nur schwer verständlich.

    – Ihr werdet in Deutschland immer bekannter und auch beliebter. Plant ihr, 2003 einige Gigs hier zu spielen?
    TK: Schön zu hören! Ich würde liebend gern mehr in Deutschland spielen, aber wir waren dort bisher einfach noch viel zu unbekannt. Aber wenn das besser wird – großartig! Ich bin mir sicher, dass wir mit dem neuen Album wieder durch Europa touren werden, und dann sicherlich auch in Deutschland sein werden! Ich hoffe, wir können dann auf einigen Festivals spielen, Wacken zum Beispiel.

    – Welche Pläne habt ihr für die nächste Zeit und die Zukunft?
    TK: Ich bin völlig ausgebucht mit den Aufnahmen für das Album, gerade das beherrscht mein Leben hauptsächlich in diesem Jahr. Hoffentlich kann ich vor Weihnachten ein bisschen ausspannen. Ich will mir jetzt nicht so viele Gedanken über die Zukunft machen, falls ich mir Pläne schmieden würde, würden die durchs Touren und promoten im nächsten Jahr eh nur alle zerstört werden.

    – Was denkst du über kleine Webzine-Schreiber, die dich immer und immer wieder das gleiche fragen?
    TK: Es ist nichts falschen an den Leuten, die mir die gleichen Fragen immer wieder stellen. Aber neue Fragen machen meine Arbeit wesentlich intressanter, ich würdige immer, wenn jemand ein wenig Phantasie hat. Ich bin ja schon froh, dass ich nicht zu viele dieser „Erzähl mir kurz die Geschichte von Sonata, wie hat alles angefangen??“-Fragen bekomme – Aaarrggh!

    – Was denkst du, wenn du die folgenen Begriffe liest:
    Bohnen: Ich weiß, was du im Hinterkopf hast, aber… Fürze
    Kommerz: New Metal. Ich mag diesen Rapmetal-Kram nicht. Entweder Rap oder Metal – aber nicht beides.
    Liebe: gooooood!
    Intoleranz: baaaad!
    Alkohol: Sehr gut, falls die es irgendwie schaffen würden, die Kopfschmerzen danach wegzukriegen!
    New Metal: Wie Nu-Metal.. Bis auf ganz, ganz wenige Ausnahmen schrecklich.
    Wacken: Großartiges Festival! Ich hoffe, dort gibt’s in Zukunft mehr Sonnenschein.
    Online-Mags: Cool! Für kleine Mags gibt es eine Zuknuft, da bin ich mir sicher.
    MP3: Kontrovers
    Religion: Privatsache